Phrasal verbs with: IN & OUT

      

  + 7 Phrasal verbs with: IN & OUT

   teacher 06, 2009 11:28 am

Phrasal Verbs with IN




ASK IN


(separable) to request someone to come in


At the end of the date, I asked Mary in.


BASH IN


(separable) to damage something by hitting it
violently


Vandals bashed in the windows of my new Lamborghini.


BLEND IN


(intransitive) to match or look the same as the
surroundings


In Max's neighborhood, if you don't blend in, you'll get beat up.


BREAK IN


(intransitive) to forcibly enter a building


Max called the police when he thought he heard someone breaking in.


BREAK IN


(separable) to work or repeatedly use something so
that it becomes comfortable or easily usable


Max's shoes hurt him as he had not yet broke them in.


BRING IN


(separable) to earn money


Jill hates her new job, but shes bringing in a lot of money.


BRING IN


(separable) to reach a verdict


The judge declared a mistrial because the jury could not bring in a
verdict.



BRING IN


(separable) to arrest someone; to bring someone to the
police station (usually for questioning)


The police brought Max in for robbing the bank.


BUTT IN


(intransitive) to enter a conversation uninvited


"Excuse me for butting in, but I couldn't help overhearing..."


CHECK IN


(separable) to register(usually at a hotel, airport,
or hospital)


The terrorist sweated nervously as he checked his baggage in.


COLOR IN


(separable) to fill with color (usually an outline)


Max happily colored in the pictures in his textbook.


COME IN


(intransitive) to arrive, get in


News came in that next years car models have just come in.


COME IN


(intransitive) to place in a race or contest


Frank came in second in the Boston Marathon.


COME IN


(intransitive) to be received (signal)


No matter how much Max adjusted the antenna, the radio station just didnt
come in very well.



FILL IN


(separable) to complete where needed


Please fill in the blanks.


FIT IN


(intransitive) to get along with others in a group


Bill decided to go into politics when he discovered he didn't fit in
anywhere else.



GET IN


(intransitive) to arrive


When did you get in from Paris?


HAND IN


(separable) to turn in or give work you have done


Max was embarrassed about handing in his homework late.


JUMP IN


(intransitive) to join an activity while its in
progress; to interrupt


I was telling the story to Mary, but Max kept jumping in.


LOCK IN


(separable) to lock the door so that someone can't
leave


Mary was afraid that Max might flee, so she locked him in.


RUSH IN


(intransitive) to enter quickly


The students rushed in because they were eager to learn.


STAY IN


(intransitive) to not go out


Bill decided to stay in this weekend because he was tired of going out.


TAKE IN


(separable) to reduce in size; make smaller


Max lost a lot of weight and had to have all of his pants taken in.


TAKE IN


(separable) to give shelter to; to receive as a guest,
or lodger


The Smiths took Barney in while he was in town.


TAKE IN


(separable) to see for enjoyment


We took in the sights in the morning and took in a movie later in the
evening.



TRADE IN


(separable) to exchange something (usually used) for
payment or partial payment for something else.


Max traded his old jalopy in as a down payment on a new BMW.


TURN IN


(separable) to submit or give work done for someone


Max turns in his homework almost always on time.

















































Phrasal Verbs with OUT




ASK OUT


(separable) to request someone to go on a date with
you


I asked Mary out again. She refused.


BAIL OUT


(intransitive) to jump out of an airplane (usually when
its going to crash)


Luckily the pilot bailed out before his plane hit the side of the mountain.


BAIL OUT


(intransitive) to quit or stop doing something (usually
when experiencing difficulties)


The congressional candidate bailed out of the race because there was no
hope that he could raise enough money to win.



BAIL OUT


(separable) to rescue someone from a difficult
situation


Maxs uncle bailed him out of the financial problems he was having.


BLACK OUT


(intransitive) to lose consciousness momentarily


Max had a very severe headache and blacked out several times, so his doctor
admitted him to the hospital.



BREAK OUT


(intransitive) to suddenly develop or erupt


A riot broke out in Los Angeles
today.



CHICKEN OUT


(intransitive) not to do something because of fear


Max wanted to ask Mary out on a date, but he chickened out.


COME OUT


(intransitive) to become known, to come into public view,
to debut


The news of the candidates past sexual misconduct came out just before the
election.



COME OUT


(intransitive) to turn out, result


Everything came out fine in the end


COME OUT


(intransitive) to declare ones position publicly


The senator came out against gay marriage.


COME OUT


(intransitive) to reveal that oneself as homosexual


After years of trying to act straight, Max finally came out.


CROSS OUT


(separable) to draw a line through something


I didnt have an eraser, so I had to cross out my mistakes instead.


DISH OUT


(separable) to allocate, dispense, or distribute food
from a container


After dinner, Max dished out some delicious fruit salad for desert.


DROWN OUT


(separable) to make a sound inaudible with a louder
sound


Max uses his iPod to drown out all of the peoples voices around him.


EAT OUT


(intransitive) to go out to a restaurant to eat


Max was tired of eating out, so he stayed home and had a TV dinner.


EMPTY OUT


(separable) to remove everything from a container
making it empty


Max emptied the refrigerator out.


EMPTY OUT


(intransitive) to be vacated by people


The concert hall emptied out as soon as the concert was over.


EVEN OUT


(separable) to make something measure the same as
something else


Max has trouble evening out his sideburns since one ear is lower than the
other.



FIND OUT


(separable) to learn or discover


Mary was mad when she found out that she was adopted.


GET OUT


(intransitive) to become known


The news about Mary got out very quickly.


GET OUT


(intransitive) to escape or leave


Sam wouldnt stop talking so we asked him to get out.


GET OUT


(separable) cause to escape or leave


Please get that cat out of here.


GIVE OUT


(inseparable) to distribute


Mary is very happy that they give needles out at the local clinic.


HAND OUT


(separable) to distribute


Lee Harvey often handed out leaflets on the street corner.


KICK OUT


(separable) to force to leave


The bouncers kicked Max out of the bar for starting a fight.


KNOCK OUT


(intransitive) to make someone unconscious


That last drink I had really knocked me out.


LEAVE OUT


(separable) to not include


A margarita is not a margarita if you leave the tequila out.


LOCK OUT


(separable) to lock the door so that someone can't
enter


Jane locked Jack out of the bathroom because she wanted some privacy.


LOOK OUT


(intransitive) to be careful; watchful; to protect
someones interests


Most politicians just look out for themselves and their wealthy
constituents. They have little regard for the average person.



PASS OUT


(separable) to distribute


The teacher passed the assignment out.


PASS OUT


(intransitive) to lose consciousness


Mary was so tired that she passed out as soon as she got home.


PICK OUT


(separable) to choose


When shopping for watermelon, I like to pick out the biggest.


PRINT OUT


(separable) to print something from a computer


I need to buy some more paper for my printer so that I can print out my
report for history class.



PUT OUT


(separable) to extinguish


The firefighters put the fire out.


PUT OUT


(separable) to publish; issue


The government put out a news brief to misinform the public.


PUT OUT


(separable) to exert, extend


The workers put out considerable effort to get the job done on time.


PUT OUT


(separable) to expel


Please put the cat out.


RUSH OUT


(intransitive) to exit quickly


The workers all rushed out because it was time to go home.


SELL OUT


(separable) to sell everything in the store


We can't go to the concert. The tickets have been sold out


SELL OUT


(separable) to compromise one's values for personal
gain


Catherine sold out. I guess power and money mean more to her than what she
said were her personal values.



SHOUT OUT


(separable) to speak very loudly; to announce


Max shouted the directions to his house out.


SORT OUT


(separable) to arrange or separate by type, class,
category, etc.


Max sorted his socks out.


SORT OUT


(separable) to resolve problems or difficulties


Max tried to sort out the misunderstanding he had with Mary.


STAND OUT


(intransitive) to be prominent or conspicuous


Maxs car stands out among all of the cars in the parking lot because of
its florescent green paintjob.



STAY OUT


(intransitive) to not return home past the regular time


Bill got angry when his wife stayed out all night.


TAKE OUT


(separable) to take someone on a date


Max took Mary out to a fancy restaurant.


TAKE OUT


(separable) to extract; remove


Max takes out the trash every night.


THAW OUT


(intransitive) to change from a frozen state to a
non-frozen state


The ice-covered lakes thaw out in the springtime.


THAW OUT


(separable) to cause something to change from a frozen
state to a non-frozen state by warming it


The warm sun thawed out the icy sidewalk.


THROW OUT


(separable) to discard


Mary threw out all of her old clothes.


TRY OUT


(separable) to test to see if something is suitable


I'm going to try out some new recipes for dinner this week.


TURN OUT


(separable) to switch off


Please turn out the lights.


WALK OUT


(intransitive) to leave as a sign of protest


The workers walked out to protest the low wages.







Phrasal Verbs with INTO




BREAK INTO


(inseparable) to forcibly enter


Mary broke into the car to steal the stereo.


COME INTO


(inseparable) to acquire


Mary came into a lot of money when her grandfather passed away.


GET INTO


(inseparable) to be involved with


If you get into the wrong crowd, you are likely to get into a lot of
trouble.



LOOK INTO


(inseparable) to investigate


The grand jury is looking into the allegations that bribes influenced the
mayor's actions.



RUN INTO


(inseparable) to meet unexpectedly


I was surprised when I ran into Bill on the way to the store yesterday.


TALK INTO


(separable) to persuade to do something


Max talked Mary into going to Mexico with him.
avatar
teacher



: 2
: 58
: 2 BAC
: 18/11/2008

    

  + 7

   teacher 06, 2009 11:33 am






















:

:5 2006--.200

: 2

: 2







Television Changes the Rules







The influence of television
on sports cannot be overestimated. The influence is based on the insatiable
appetite of the public for sporting events. This vast market can be
reached at one time only by radio and television, and television is by far the
preferred medium. . The visual impact of television has brought hours of every
known sport, from arm wrestling to yachting, into the living rooms of millions
of viewers.



The influence of television derives from its
visual immediacy, but its power over sports is based on money. The money comes
from com al sponsors, who buy broadcast time from the television companies.
The television stations and the networks then must often pay the professional
leagues or other organizations for the right to broadcast the events.



By 1989 more than 400 corporations had
established budgets for sports marketing. Direct corporate sponsorship makes
the company name known to television viewers; General Motors, for example, was
spending 581,000 dollars a day. Another aspect of corporate marketing involves
obtaining the services of well-known athletes to do com als.



The power of television to create and sustain
viewing markets has allowed it to influence the playing of the games. In some
cases the rules have been changed to accommodate programming. Changes such as
the 20-second rule and the 3-point basket in basketball have not necessarily
been mandated by television, but they have been adopted to speed up the
game and to make it more appealing to viewers. The tiebreaker that was
introduced to shorten televised tennis matches was soon adopted for regular
tournament play.



The number of time-outs has been increased
during games to allow for com als. Everyone who watches professional
football is aware of the two-minute warning near the end of each half. The time
is, of course, used for com als. And viewers who once enjoyed football
halftime shows now must usually miss them, while com als and scores
from other games are broadcast.



Television has also been responsible for
changes in the scheduling of games. Because of television marketing, baseball
has become largely a night game. Most World Series games, except for those
played on weekends, are broadcast at night. Games that were once played at the
same time are now spaced out to hold viewers.






A. C O M P R E H E N S I O N : 15 MARKS


I- Find
in the text words or expressions meaning the same as
:
( 3 MARKS )


1.
effect of the picture.


2.
keep


3.
attractive





II- What
do the underlined words in the text refer to?
(3 marks )


1.
this vast market (line 2)


2.
they (line 17)


3.
them (line 23)





III- Complete
the following sentences with information from the text
:
(4 marks)


1.
In order to fit the programming of TV,
some------------------------------------------- .


2.
During football
halftimes, ------------------------------------------------------------- .





IV- Answer
these questions according to the text
:
5 marks


How does TV get money?


1.
Pick out from the text two reasons explaining the great influence of TV
on sports.


2.
How do sport sponsors benefit from their sponsorship?


3.
What is the writers purpose?


a-
To show the importance of TV in the life of sportsmen.


b-
To persuade the reader to practice sport.


c-
To show the power of TV over sport.


d-
To present different sports to the reader.





B. L A N G U A G E : 10 MARKS


I- Rewrite these sentences as indicated: 3
marks


1.
TV has brought sporting events into the living rooms of millions of
viewers.


Sporting
events------------------------------------------------------------------------
.


2.
The Moroccan football team didnt win the last African Cup in Tunisia.


We wish
------------------------------------------------------------------------- .


3.
Morocco has lately launched a new channel. This channel
aims to educate its viewers.


The new channel -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
.





II- fill
in the blanks with the correct word from the list
: ( 2 marks )



Come across- find out- turn down- pick up- Fill in


You didnt (-1) the
application form correctly; they will certainly (--2-it--).





III- Give
the correct form of the words between brackets
:
(3 marks)


Parents
are worried about the (1-harm) effects of TV on their children. They believe in
the (2-necessary) of guiding their children and the need for more (3-
education) channels.





IV- Fill in the blanks with an appropriate word to form collocationsSad2 marks)


There is no (--1--)
evidence about the effects of TV on children; there are just some plausible
(--2--) about them. However, all specialists agree that parents should be
vigilant when their children are watching TV.





C. W R I T I N G: 15 MARKS





Write an article to
your school magazine showing the effects of TV on students.
avatar
teacher



: 2
: 58
: 2 BAC
: 18/11/2008

    

  + 7 : Phrasal verbs with: IN & OUT

   armyfreak 09, 2009 8:09 am

I got 10/20 in this test
didn't I?

_________________

avatar
armyfreak



: 17
: 26
: 2 BAC
: 04/10/2008

    

      

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